All posts by VP

It’s a blog about gardening, allotmenteering and my life based in Chippenham, Wiltshire. Spiced with a sense of humour, but also insightful, it reflects my wide ranging interests. Poised on the cusp of a life shift, I’m a Jill of all trades, interested in everything that happens along my path.

Friday Bench: Mosaic

Now you see him…

…Now you don’t πŸ˜‰

The poster in C’Ville Arts Cooperative Gallery‘s window says (abridged and anglicised slightly):

“Seat of Harmony

Created for C’Ville Arts Artists’ Cooperative by Virginia Gardner December 2007.

The loveseat is sculpted in polystyrene. Sheets of poly were laminated together to form large blocks, which were then sculpted to form a large, comfy sofa. Several layers of fibreglass mesh and concrete were applied, over which the mosaic of mixed materials was applied.

It was designed specifically for this spot outside C’Ville Arts and is not for sale.

Artists from the cooperative contributed small personal objects which were also incorporated into the design, representing the cooperative nature of their organisation. The five elements of Feng Shui (Water, Fire, Earth, Wood and Metal) have been defined symbolically and form the basis of the design. Feng Shui can be described as the natural path with the least resistance. The practice of Feng Shui is about creating harmony within our environment.

The Hole in the centre is provided for drainage. I would appreciate it if you do not place objects in the hole. It’s a pain cleaning it out. Thank you.”

Visitors are encouraged to take photos and send them to the gallery. Sadly the website address given on the sign no longer appears to exist. I’ll be sending this blog post to them by other means πŸ™‚

 

Bedlam

A different kind of blue plaque

A surprise find near Liverpool Street Station, courtesy of a diversion on the way to Broadgate Circle forced by the building of Crossrail. Bethlehem hospital was a notorious mental institution from which the word ‘bedlam’ is derived from the hospital’s old nickname. It has also served as inspiration for numerous stories and horror films.

This is the second of these plaques I’ve found. I came across the first last year at the site of Upholder’s Hall, a building destroyed in the Fire of London.

Apparently there are about 160 of them maintained by the City of London*. I’m surprised it’s taken me so long to find them, seeing I’ve visited London frequently over the past few years.

The city’s website has taken down its map, so this one is going to come in handy in future. I also like this article about some of London’s alternative schemes.

* = of this particular scheme which is one of the oldest in the world, and differs from the more familiar one run by English Heritage.