Tag Archives: Ellesmere Port

Canal Art

Traditional narrowboats are famous for their brightly coloured canal art. Boat doors and utensils such as cans and spoons are covered with the ‘Roses and Castles’ form. The sides of boats often have stripes and the pictured diamond motif.

This picture was taken at one of the display boats inside the National Waterways Museum at Ellesmere Port.

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National Waterways Museum

The complex at Ellesmere Port is vast, so it’s difficult to provide an all encompassing scene to give you a real overview of the place. However, whilst this picture is just a portion of what’s on offer, it does show a number of the key elements which shows you why this is such a good place for a canal museum.

  • Canals which still work
  • Canals with locks
  • Basin areas and moorings
  • Lots of brightly painted boats
  • Typical canal art
  • Working boats and lots more requiring restoration and depicting a good cross-section of the kind of boats which worked the canals
  • A huge complex of different building which were used during the heyday of canals
  • Volunteers getting stuck in!

Steam Heat

My husband spent a lot of time in the engine rooms at the National Waterways Museum. Sadly the steam engine is no longer in use via its rather smartly kept boilers. However, there were plenty of photo opportunities for me: lots of little shiny details to pick out. I’m assuming this sign was to remind the operator that the flow of steam from the boiler to the engine needed to be kept within certain limits.

Cill or Sill?

I’ve been on many a canal holiday and know how important it is to keep a narrowboat as forward as possible so that it doesn’t run aground as the lock fills. However, it wasn’t until we visited the National Waterways Museum at Ellesmere Port just over a week ago that I realised cill is spelled cill and not sill as in windowsill.